Amazing Eagles: Discover Their Fascinating Habits and Skills

Amazing Eagles: Discover Their Fascinating Habits and Skills

Birds of prey are fascinating creatures that have evolved over millions of years to become some of the most efficient hunters in nature. These birds use various techniques to hunt their prey, including swooping down from high above, using stealth and camouflage, and even utilising complex hunting calls. This blog post will focus on three fascinating species of eagle.
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Birds of prey are fascinating creatures that have evolved over millions of years to become some of the most efficient hunters in nature. These birds use various techniques to hunt their prey, including swooping down from high above, using stealth and camouflage, and even utilising complex hunting calls. This blog post will focus on three fascinating species of eagle but birds of prey include hawks, falcons, and owls. These birds can be found worldwide in various habitats, from temperate forests to arid deserts.
While birds of prey are highly adaptable and have adapted to survive in many different environments, they are also threatened by human activities such as habitat destruction and climate change. To protect these amazing animals, we must work to mitigate the impact of human activities on birds of prey and their habitats by preserving critical habitats, restoring degraded ecosystems, and spreading awareness about the importance of birds of prey to our environment to ensure that birds of prey will continue to thrive for generations.

What Makes Bald Eagles So Special?

Bald eagles are one of North America's most well-known birds of prey, and their white head and tail feathers help quickly identify them. Bald eagles are apex predators, meaning they sit at the top of the food chain in their ecosystem. Bald eagle bodies are strong and flexible, built for diving quickly and making tight turns during flight. The bald eagle has a wingspan between 6" and 8" feet. Female bald eagles can weigh up to 30% more than their male counterparts (3 – 6.3 kg). Bald eagles have fantastic eyesight (4-8 times better than humans) and excel in spotting small prey from the sky. Their diets vary by geographic region depending on what prey is available, but fish tend to be a staple. They will eat carrion and small mammals, reptiles, other birds, and larger animals like deer fawns. When hunting, a bald eagle will dive quickly (120 -160 km/h) towards its prey and grab it in a vice-like death grip in its talons. The bald eagle builds the biggest tree nest recorded for any animal species, measuring up to 4 m (13 ft) deep, 2.5 m (8.2 ft) wide, and one metric ton in weight. Thanks to increased conservation efforts, they were removed from the endangered species list in North America in 2007.

How Does a Golden Eagle Hunt?

Golden eagles are mighty and majestic birds of prey, easily recognisable due to their distinct golden head and neck, brown body colour, long wingspan and tail. Golden eagles live in various habitats, such as mountainous areas or open grassland. They also range widely across Europe, Asia, Northern Africa and North America. Golden eagles eat mammals and birds, alive and as carrion. The type of prey depends on the habitat of the golden eagle but includes rabbits, squirrels, grouse, gulls and rock ptarmigan (a partridge-sized gamebird). Golden eagles hunt by swooping down from a high altitude onto their prey at speeds of up to 193 km/h. They use their sharp talons to catch their target before grasping it with their beak. Golden eagles occasionally practice cooperative hunting, either teaming up with their mate to harass prey or rarely with other golden eagles to attack larger predators such as foxes, wild turkeys, and newborn deer!
Golden eagles are truly majestic birds that bring a unique beauty to the sky and play an essential role in nature's delicate balance. They are necessary for maintaining a healthy balance within their ecosystems. As hunters, they prey on whatever prey is locally abundant - without golden eagles, many species would be left unchecked, which could lead to population explosions. 

How Did The Harpy Eagle Get Its Name?

The harpy eagle (below, arriving at a nest with a brown capuchin monkey) is one of the largest and most powerful raptors. The name 'harpy' refers to the harpies in Ancient Greek Mythology who were spirits with the face of a woman and the body of a vulture. It lives in tropical forests between Mexico to Brazil and the north of Argentina. They boast a broad wingspan and a head crowned with beautiful white feathers. Harpy eagles can breed from the age of five and live up to 35 years. They live in pairs but hunt alone by perching silently in trees, waiting for their prey before silently swooping and grabbing them in their talons, which are the largest of any eagle. The harpy eagle feeds on sloths, opossums, monkeys, birds, iguanas and snakes. 
Harpy eagles are rare and classified as a threatened species. Keeping eagles healthy also requires balancing preserving food sources and keeping their populations healthy and sustainable. Unfortunately, their populations are in slow decline due to habitat loss, the general degradation of forest ecosystems and human interference, such as illegal hunting. The bird is not known to prey on humans and only rarely on domestic stock, but some hunters are intimidated by the bird's large size and fearless behaviour around humans. Many countries, such as Brazil, Panama, Mexico, Belize and Colombia, employ conservation and research initiatives to help preserve and protect the harpy eagle. They monitor individual birds and nesting sights and breed and rehabilitate captive birds to reintroduce them to safe habitats.
Harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) arriving at a nest with a brown capuchin monkey

Interested In Learning More?

Vault Editions invites you to explore the fascinating world of birds through our latest release, Birds: An Image Archive for Artists and Designers. This curated pictorial archive highlights the exceptionally intricate illustrative work of ornithologists and naturalists of the 17th and 18th centuries. Birds: An Image Archive for Artists and Designers is excellent value for money and features 422 etchings and engravings depicting eagles, vultures, falcons, hawks, kestrels, kingfishers, ravens, songbirds, flamingos, orioles, mockingbirds, parrots and cockatoos, as well as herons, cormorants, gulls, ostriches, emus and much more. Each image is incredibly intricate and provides a wealth of detail to study for artists and designers alike.
Each book comes with a unique download link providing instant access to high-resolution files of all 422 images featured. These images can be used in art and graphic design projects or printed and framed to make stunning decorative artworks. We promise you will be impressed with this pictorial archive.
Delve into the fascinating world of birds today with 
Birds: An Image Archive for Artists and Designers.
 

Monsters and Beasts

Interested in learning more? Get Monsters & Beastsvia paperback and eBook. This title features hundreds of exquisitely crafted 17th and 18th-century etchings and engravings of monsters and beasts. This pictorial archive features serpents, animal mutations, sea monsters, dragons, griffins, chimeras, bizarre human mutations and abnormalities, extraordinary fanciful animals and much more.

Image Download Included: Each book comes with a download link providing instant access to high-resolution files of all images featured. These images can be used in art and graphic design projects, or printed and framed to make stunning decorative artworks. This book is ideal for graphic designers, illustrators, tattooists and fine artists.